The economics of violence in Latin America a theory of political competition by Wilber A. Chaffee

Cover of: The economics of violence in Latin America | Wilber A. Chaffee

Published by Praeger in Westport, Conn .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • Latin America,
  • Latin America.

Subjects:

  • Political science -- Economic aspects.,
  • Political culture -- Latin America.,
  • Political violence -- Latin America.,
  • Revolutions -- Latin America -- Case studies.,
  • Latin America -- Politics and government -- 20th century.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [157]-166) and index.

Book details

StatementWilber Albert Chaffee, Jr.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJA77 .C48 1992
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 173 p. ;
Number of Pages173
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1703134M
ISBN 100275942988
LC Control Number92004200

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Chaffee applies microeconomic theory to generate hypotheses and conclusions, using examples from Latin America to illustrate the efficacy of the framework. The Economics of Violence in Latin America will interest political scientists, economists, and policy-makers, especially those concerned with democratic theory and practice in the nonindustrialized by: 6.

Economic Development Strategies and the Evolution of Violence in Latin America explores the links between Latin American governments' economic policies and the nature and dynamics of inter-group cturer: Palgrave Macmillan. Economic Development Strategies and the Evolution of Violence in Latin America explores the links between Latin American governments' economic policies and the nature and dynamics of inter-group : Hardcover.

The economics of violence in Latin America — First published in Subjects Case studies, Economic aspects, Economic aspects of Political science, Political culture, Political science, Political violence, Politics and government, Revolutions, Wirtschaft, O konomische Theorie der Politik, Gewalt, PolitikCited by: 6.

The book is essential reading for public security and development specialists looking for a deeper understanding of the drivers of violence in Latin America and the Caribbean, and insights into how to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past.'.

Robert Muggah - Research Director, Instituto Igarapé, Brazil. “This book is a must-read for understanding crime and violence in Latin America. It challenges views of Latin American violence that either focus too much on regional particularities or univocally stress the role of the state as the overpowering site of violence and repression.

In 32 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean alone, at least 3, women were victims of femicide in According to the report by ECLAC, the five countries with the highest rates of femicide in Latin America are: El Salvador ( femicides perwomen), Honduras (), Bolivia (), Guatemala () and the Dominican Republic ().

Violence Against Women in Latin America and the Caribbean: A comparative analysis of population-based data from 12 countries is the first report to present a comparative analysis of nationally representative data on violence against women from a large. Latin America is caught in a vicious circle, where economic growth is thwarted by high crime rates, and insufficient economic opportunity contributes to high crime.

[ citation needed ] Crime and violence thrives as the rule of law is weak, economic opportunity is The economics of violence in Latin America book, and education is poor. The conference entitled "Violence in Latin America: Policy Implications from Studies on the Attitudes and Costs of Violence" was co-sponsored by DRCLAS, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the Inter-American Development Bank, the William and.

This book analyses the war against drugs, violence in streets, schools and families, and mining conflicts in Latin America. It examines the nonviolent negotiations, human rights, peacebuilding and education, explores security in cyberspace and proposes to overcome xenophobia, white supremacy, sexism, and homophobia, where social inequality increases injustice and violence.

Between Legitimacy and Violence is an authoritative, sweeping history of Colombia’s “long twentieth century,” from the tumultuous civil wars of the late nineteenth century to the drug wars of the. Get this from a library. The economics of violence in Latin America: a theory of political competition.

[Wilber A Chaffee]. About the Book. A reexamination of the causes of violence in Latin America and a challenge to preconceptions of the possibility of change. Latin America is one of the most violent regions in the world. It has suffered waves of repressive authoritarian rule, organized armed insurgency and civil war, violent protest, and ballooning rates of.

In Latin America, violence against women and girls is pervasive and practiced with relative impunity. According to a November United Nations Development Program Report, Latin America has the highest rate in the world of gender-based sexual violence against women, and in Central America two of every three women killed are victims of femicide, while the Economic Commission for Latin America.

political violence in internal conflicts and offers new insights into the processes of escalation and de-escalation of political violence in irregular warfare. My study contributes to this global project by focusing on empirically-based Latin American case studies.

"The Political and Economic Origins of Violence and Insecurity in Contemporary Latin America: Past Trajectories and Future Prospects", Violent Democracies in Latin America.

Ascher W., Mirovitskaya N. () Economic Development Patterns and the Evolution of Violence in Latin America. In: Ascher W., Mirovitskaya N.

(eds) Economic Development Strategies and the Evolution of Violence in Latin America. Gang violence in Latin America By Dennis Rodgers Although gangs are not a new feature of the violence panorama in Latin America, they have come to the fore in an unprecedented manner in the post-Cold War period, to the extent that they are now widely considered to epitomize the dynamics of contemporary regional brutality.

Stop the Violence in Latin America: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood (Latin American Development Forum) [Chioda, Laura] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Stop the Violence in Latin America: A Look at Prevention from Cradle to Adulthood (Latin American Development Forum)Cited by: 6.

Economic Development Strategies and the Evolution of Violence in Latin America explores the links between Latin American governments' economic policies and the nature and dynamics of inter-group viole Search within book.

Front Matter. It is a useful book for anyone interested in the anthropology of violence, crime and resistance or in local-level politics in Latin America, but it also resonates with discussions on post-9/11 global politics where security is increasingly purchased at the price of justice.".

Book listing pages for Violence in Latin American History titles. In Latin America, women turn to apps to combat sexual violence Apps that alert friends and report crime to authorities are increasingly popular in one of the world's most dangerous. Get this from a library.

The politics of violence in Latin America. [Pablo Policzer;] -- "Latin America is one of the most violent regions in the world. It has suffered waves of repressive authoritarian rule, organized armed insurgency and civil war, violent protest, and ballooning rates.

Latin America is the most violent region on the planet.¹ The continent has suffered waves of repressive authoritarian rule, organized armed insurgency and civil war, violent protest, and, especially in recent decades, very high rates of criminal violence. The Latin American protests correspond to a series of protests all over Latin America that coincided inand that is part of a larger context of international contestation movements since the end of Some of these protests continued into There are various reasons for the emergence of these waves of protests, but all were anti-governments protests aiming to pressuring.

The Economics of Contemporary Latin America is a superb contribution to our understanding of the region's economic and social transformation. The authors thoroughly dissect the main forces driving economic changes since the independence movements in the region, cover a lot of the scholarly research, and distill policy lessons to address continuing challenges.

This edited volume explores political violence and genocide in Latin America during the Cold War, examining this in light of the United States’ hegemonic position on the continent.

Using case studies based on the regimes of Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Peru and Uruguay, this book shows how U.S foreign policy – far from promoting long term political stability and democratic institutions. Research indicates that gender-based violence costs the world approximately $ trillion a year, but governments have struggled to address it.

Thoug. In a must-read chapter for those thinking about violence in the region, Jean Daudelin underscores recurring flaws in the study of Latin American violence.

National and even subnational data on homicides and other crime hide variations in the location of violence and the nature of. Latin America is a diverse place, but there are common themes that have shaped the region over the last millennium.

Marie Arana, literary director of the National Book Festival, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how exploitation, violence and religion have combined to. The study of social violence in Latin America has stood at the periphery of cross-national research despite the region being one of the most violent in the contemporary world.

This article provides a comprehensive review of theories of crime and presents an empirical analysis of social violence in Latin America from to   Guatemala is Central America’s largest economy, but one of the worst-off countries in Latin America by income equality.

About 60 percent of Guatemalans live in poverty, and that percentage is significantly higher among the indigenous majority. Many who migrate come from indigenous communities where Spanish is not the primary language.

United States and Latin American drug control. Sincethe U.S. Congress has supported the Central American Regional Security Initiative (CARSI) with approximately $ million to "fund programs for narcotics interdiction, strengthening law enforcement and justice institutions and violence prevention through work with at-risk youth".

The CARSI offers equipment (vehicles and communication. Latin America and the Caribbean is the most violent region in the world for women, the United Nations said today, highlighting Central America and Mexico as particularly dangerous.

The Chicago Boys were a group of Chilean economists prominent around the s and s, the majority of whom were educated at the Department of Economics of the University of Chicago under Milton Friedman and Arnold Harberger, or at its affiliate in the economics department at the Pontifical Catholic University of their return to Latin America they adopted positions in numerous.

In this review of violence in Latin America, I have attempted to organize the region's scholarly literature around the most influential and leading research issues. Three main lines of research have materialized from this overview. First, one line of research is concerned with the difference between the old patterns of violence and the so-called new violence.

Second, a line of research focuses. Latin America is both the world's most urbanized fastest developing regions, where the links between social exclusion, inequality and violence are clearly visible.

The banal, ubiquitous nature of drug crime, robbery, gang and intra-family violence destabilizes countries' economies and harms their people and social ters with Violence & Crime in Latin America explores the.

When viewed from the perspective of those who suffer the consequences of repressive approaches to public security, it is often difficult to distinguish state agents from criminals. The mistreatme. Latin America — home to eight percent of the global population but nearly half of recent COVID deaths — is in the eye of the storm, with more thanof the world’s ,23 hours ago  A Plan International online survey conducted in June of teenage girls in 12 countries, including five Latin American countries, showed most of them were worried about gender-based violence.One member of the troubled Latin American nation’s delegation was spotted casually reading a book, reportedly on Latin American independence leader Simón Bolívar, while the U.S.

president spoke.

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